Tag Archives: “National Labor Relations Act”

Convergys Corporation and LogistiCare Solutions, Incorporated v. NLRB – The Fifth Circuit Considers Class and Collective Action Waivers Without Arbitration Agreements

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit decided two cases considering the impact of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) on class or collective action waivers required by companies for their applicants and employees. Convergys Corporation The first decision, in Convergys Corporation v. NLRB, No. 15-60860 (5th Cir. Aug. 7, 2017), addressed whether … Continue Reading

Eighth Circuit Stays the Course in the Cellular Sales of Missouri Opinion, Rejecting the NLRB’s Arguments Against Class Waivers

Following in the wake of an earlier opinion, the Eighth Circuit rebutted the National Labor Relations Board’s (“Board”) arguments that by requiring employees to enter into arbitration agreements with a class and collective action waiver, it violated the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”). This comes only a week after the Seventh Circuit ruled in favor … Continue Reading

The Board vs. the Courts: Will 2016 mark the final showdown for class action waivers in arbitration agreements?

Arbitration agreements are practical tools that help employers protect confidential information and avoid the costs associated with traditional litigation. They can also be an extremely effective mechanism for employers to reduce exposure to risky employment litigation and potentially abusive collective action claims under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”). We’ve written extensively on the courts’ … Continue Reading

New York Court Rejects D.R. Horton; Orders Arbitration Despite Class Action Waiver

A great deal of intellectual energy has been spent on the issue of whether various employment arbitration agreements are enforceable, but the debate pretty much comes down to two camps. Over 80 years ago, in response to judicial reluctance to enforce arbitration agreements, Congress passed the Federal Arbitration Act. Virtually every court on both sides … Continue Reading
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